Welcome! This forum has a treasure trove of great info – Scouters helping Scouters! Just a heads up, though - all content, information, and opinions shared on this forum are those of the author, not the BSA.
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

Scouting Forums

Interpreter Strip for Webelos Scout

Hi Everyone!

I’m looking to hear what others consider for achievement of this award. I have a scout who has taken 6 months of American Sign Language. He is by no means “fluent”… but he knows over 200 signs and has attended gatherings among the deaf community and interacted with people. He probably never held an individual 5-minute conversation with one individual (he’s 10), but did primarily use sign to communicate during the time he was there (an hour).

He probably could not translate a 2-minute speech or address, but does know enough to translate for someone else in a conversation on certain topics like food or animals or general greetings.

Here are the requirements:

  1. Carrying on a five-minute conversation in this language.
  2. Translating a two-minute speech or address.
  3. Writing a letter in the language (does not apply for sign language).
  4. Translating 200 words from the written word.

How hard and fast are these requirements? If he really does need to be “fluent” … I will encourage him to keep working on it.

Requirements are just that - they are as written - you cannot add or subtract,

5 Likes

Thanks Donovan. I definitely understand the term “requirements”. I may be overthinking it then, if the requirement leaves something open to interpretation, it is left to the leader to determine the interpretation. Thanks.

The requirements are there and they cannot be added to or removed. If he cannot carry on a 5-minute conversation or translate a 2-minute speech, have him keep practicing until he can. If your theory was true, almost EVERY person who ever took a foreign language in school would qualify, but in reality, they cannot unless they practice or have the necessary linguistics to meet the requirement.

In a message dated 4/2/2020 10:03:18 Eastern Standard Time, scouting@discoursemail.com writes:


Katie Mitchell KMitch
April 2
Hi Everyone!

I’m looking to hear what others consider for achievement of this award. I have a scout who has taken 6 months of American Sign Language. He is by no means “fluent”… but he knows over 200 signs and has attended gatherings among the deaf community and interacted with people. He probably never held an individual 5-minute conversation with one individual (he’s 10), but did primarily use sign to communicate during the time he was there (an hour).

He probably could not translate a 2-minute speech or address, but does know enough to translate for someone else in a conversation on certain topics like food or animals or general greetings.

Here are the requirements:

  1. Carrying on a five-minute conversation in this language.
  2. Translating a two-minute speech or address.
  3. Writing a letter in the language (does not apply for sign language).
  4. Translating 200 words from the written word.
    How hard and fast are these requirements? If he really does need to be “fluent” … I will encourage him to keep working on it.

nowhere in the requirements does it say they have to be fluent.As long as they fulfill the requirements listed they earned the patch and can wear it. I wear the Spanish version and I can hold enough of a conversation that I feel comfortable wearing the patch but I don’t consider myself “fluent” like a native speaker. as others have said you cannot add or subtract any requirements. The scout needs to fulfill the requirements to be able to earn the patch. I hope this helps.

1 Like

I am fluent in ASL (American Sign Language) and let me give on a different approach of looking at why one needs to be fluent as stated in the requirements.

Suppose I was stuck in a situation and was having difficulties in communicating with someone and your Scout walked by and I saw he had the interpreter strip. I would quickly recruit his help expecting him to be fluent because he wear the ASL interpreter strip. Turns out he is not fluent at all but badge says he is. How do you think that aids the situation?

From my perspective, do you think he should wear that badge? I know people think it is cool to wear but understand too there is a purpose to the interpreter strip… helping others communicate with each other.

2 Likes

https://scoutingmagazine.org/2018/12/show-others-you-speak-their-language-with-interpreter-strips/

Interpreter Strip Assumption

Comment: The requirements do not state which language is translated. The overview implies English. It also assumes that the applicant for the award has a conversational-level command of the English language.

BSA Home > Awards > Awards Central > Interpreter Strip

Overview

To signify that a youth or adult member speaks a foreign language (one other than English)

Who Can Earn This Award?

Any member who speaks a specific foreign language; demonstrate knowledge by carrying on a five-minute conversation in this language, translating a two-minute speech or address, and writing a letter in the language (does not apply for sign language); or, translating 200 words from the written word.

American Sign Language

What is ASL? For a short definition see ASL Content Standards - Kindergarten - Grade 12, Copyright © 2018 by Gallaudet University Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center and California School for the Deaf-Riverside, page 3 - The Standards are a web-based resource to support the instruction of ASL teachers and specialists who teach ASL as a first language to deaf and hard of hearing students.

Comment: Conversing using ASL appears to require English Fingerspelling and Fingerreading plus knowledge of ASL signs. There is a ASL glossary near the end of this publication.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 24 hours after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.