BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

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Let's talk about Long Cruise

:face_with_monocle:

I have been working towards getting our Sea Scouts the skills and rank required to go after the Long Cruise badge. I’m not sure they will make it.

Should I keep encouraging the planning?

Always!

Why are you not sure they will make it? I’m sure they will make it and I’ve never met them!

PaulMcDonald

      [Paul McDonald](https://discussions.scouting.org/u/paulmcdonald)




    May 5

Always!

Why are you not sure they will make it? I’m sure they will make it and I’ve never met them!


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Previous Replies

R_LeonNoble

      [R Leon Noble](https://discussions.scouting.org/u/r_leonnoble)




    May 3

:face_with_monocle:

I have been working towards getting our Sea Scouts the skills and rank required to go after the Long Cruise badge. I’m not sure they will make it.

Should I keep encouraging the planning?


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And that will be the last time I ever reply by email…

Lacking attendance numbers means lower skill retention and almost no fundraising. As I said, I’m not sure they will make it.

I do have a couple of Sea Scouts that are motivated and a few more lackluster.

Is there a point to going if they do not yet have the skills to run the boat?

The whole point of a long cruise, just like summer camp or any high adventure trip, is to have fun and learn. If none of the youth have been on a long cruise before, plan accordingly and be sure the cruise matches the skill level. The Passport to Adventure Guide is a good place to start if you have not planned a cruse before. It was written by people who have done more long cruises than any of us.

If you are still uncomfortable why not ask other ships if they have room for your Scouts to join them, plan a joint cruise, or pick something everyone is comfortable with like a paddle cruise or day trips on the water from a “home base.”

Is there a point to going if they do not yet have the skills to run the boat?

In my experience, a ship without a long cruise is bound to fail. Without a long cruise you have to ask yourself, how will the scouts learn? How will the scouts advance? How are we going to keep the scouts engaged?

Remember also, a “long cruise” is basically what you say it is (or at least, so “they” tell me). So if you have a paddle-craft ship, you beach it and camp at the end of the day. We’re a powerboat ship, so we’ll be fishing by day and camping by night. I’ve checked with leaders-that-be and they all seem good with it.

Well…
That means I can just send them to camp with a Hobie 16 and it counts.

Reading the Sea Scout manual, the long cruise is an opportunity to put in practice the skills and leadership that the Sea Scouts learn ashore. They stand watches, execute a Station Bill, run drills, determine navigation, etc.

Our program is paddle, power, and sail with focus on the vocational training, but it doesn’t matter if the Sea Scouts aren’t able to handle a dock line.

Correct, you can send them to camp and they can sail a hobbie 16 everyday, and they can earn long cruise credit.