BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

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Sewing Merit Badge

Why isn’t there a Sewing Merit Badge? There is a lot that could be covered with such a merit badge like different stiches, materials, uses (such as car upholstery, baseballs, carpet, medical sutures, etc.), history, and knots used. Besides, the scouts can then sew all their own patches on their uniform.
Just a thought.

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I believe it’s been suggested several times before (at least as far back as the mid '80s, when I suggested it). To suggest a new merit badge, or suggest changes to an existing one, the contact point is merit.badge@scouting.org.

ETA:

My mom made me do this (and hem my uniform pants, and …) when I was a scout, which was part of what motivated me to propose the badge. It was more work than most of my other merit badges. :wink:

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Thanks for the information. I will use that contact point. I think its worth suggesting again.

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Lining up sponsorships or organizations that can help build the badge helps

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There is textiles. They could add a sewing requirement as I don’t think there is one.

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I see the similarity but I think sewing could stand on its own. There is a lot more to it than stitching cloth together.

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I must admit that my sewing experience began in scouting and assisted by my grandmother who worked as a seamstress in Manhattan. By the time I was 14 I had learned how to knit, crochet and tailor my own clothes.

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Especially if they donate. A lot… :slight_smile:

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At a minimum, sewing should be a requirement in both Scouts BSA and Cub Scouts. If nothing else, a scout should be able to sew the badges they earn on their uniform.

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I had to learn how to use a sewing machine when I was very young (cub scout age) after my mother accidentally sewed a finger and would not use a machine after that.

My wife was many things including being costume designer with 5 sewing machines (and an SM).

In my old age I now pay someone to sew on my badges primarily to save time for other tasks. I still have needle and thread kit to do quick repairs.

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I’ve also wondered this. I know many who also cross stitch and use various sewing techniques for art. Also, In the medical field there are Sutures, so there are many professions which use “sewing.”

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When I was a scout, my mom (with 3 other children younger than me) taught me how to sew my patches. Now as an adult leader, I have sewn all the patches on 4 uniform shirts. i even hemmed 2 pairs of pants. These are not difficult if you know how to do it. They are skills for life that every scout needs to know. At every court of honor I suggest that the scouts parents teach them how to do this. Even my families ether pay for someone to do it or use the sticky junk to put patches on. SAD

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I think the vast majority of my unit’s parents would need someone to teach them how to do it first. I ended up teaching my wife how to use my sewing machine when I was teaching my son how to sew on his patches. Or, more accurately, when I was teaching him how to sew the patches to hook-side backing and the loop-side to his uniform blouse. Makes changing PoR patches, lodge flaps, JTE patches, and rank badges so much easier…

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When I wrote my earlier response it made me think that this would be a good idea for a program for a troop meeting. Find a mom or dad to teach. Get everyone to bring a shirt or sash and a patch that needed to be put on it. In the end everyone learns how to do a simple repair with a needle and thread and we get one more patch sewn on.

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I would also like to see the sewing merit badge. I started sewing before kindergarten (my mom used to make/repair/alter our clothes) and my kids learned about the same age. I think all scouts should be able to sew their own badges and learn how to sew on a button, hem pants, etc.

I find it funny that people always mention textiles, which is completely different, yet there are several MB related to pets/animals. There are several other “redundant” MB’s, but sewing should really stand alone. If one got really crazy, I guess you could add knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, etc…there’s tons of things that could be learned.

As for my kids/scouts, they learn things even without the MB existing…but it sure is nice to be recognized for learning those skills.

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As you mentioned, our troop is doing this at our troop meeting tonight.

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Traditionally (and please don’t make me fish out the BL articles that I read decades ago about this), scouts were expected to spend enough time mending tents, sleeping bags, etc … that sewing would be second nature. The QM would hold an inventory repair day, and fixing damaged gear was par for the course.
I vividly remember a Home Repairs merit badge showing how to sew a patch on a broken screen.

I can’t think of other MBs that helped boys get the general concept. Textiles maybe?

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