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Youth and adult leadership - 2020 Scouts BSA JTE

Journey to Excellence (JTE) Summary - Leadership

YOUTH

Program # 9 - Patrol method: Use the patrol method to develop youth leaders.

ADULT

Volunteer Leadership # 10 - Leadership and family engagement: The troop is proactive in recruiting sufficient leaders and communicates regularly with parents.

Volunteer Leadership # 11 - Trained leadership: Have trained and engaged leaders at all levels. All leaders are required to have youth protection training.

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“Troop 2020 Scouting’s Journey to Excellence”, scorecard, 513-106, Revised 7/10/19

9 - Patrol method : Use the patrol method to develop youth leaders.

Bronze level: The troop has patrols, and each has a patrol leader. There is an SPL, if more than one patrol. The PLC meets at least four times a year
Silver level: Achieve Bronze, plus PLC meets at least six times. The troop conducts patrol leader training.
Gold level: Achieve Silver, plus PLC meets at least ten times. At least one Scout has attended an advanced training course, such as NYLT or Order of the Arrow Conference.

Measures

The troop is separated into patrols and each patrol has an elected patrol leader. If the troop has more than one patrol, there is an elected senior patrol leader. If the troop has more than one patrol, the PLC meets at least four times each year. The troop holds patrol leader training each year, and youth have the opportunity to participate in advanced training.The troop is separated into patrols and each patrol has an elected patrol leader. If the troop has more than one patrol, there is an elected senior patrol leader. If the troop has more than one patrol, the PLC meets at least four times each year. The troop holds patrol leader training each year, and youth have the opportunity to participate in advanced training.

References

  • “Your Patrol and Your Troop”, The Patrol Leader Handbook, date unknown. - patrol positions of leadership
  • "A beginner’s guide to the patrol method ", September 5, 2014, by Bryan Wendell, Scouting magazine*
  • The Patrol Leader Handbook 2019, Scout Shop 647788
  • Senior Patrol Leader Handbook 2019, Scout Shop 647789
  • Section 1 - Scout Basics, Chapter 3 - “The Patrol Method”, pp.17-20, and Appendix - “The Patrol Leaders’ Council - Checklist”, p. 147, in the Scouts BSA Troop Leader Guidebook, vol. 1, 2018 printing, Scout Shop item 33009, SKU 647785
  • The Patrol, Troop Leader Resources
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“Troop 2020 Scouting’s Journey to Excellence”, scorecard, 513-106, Revised 7/10/19

10 - Leadership and family engagement: The troop is proactive in recruiting sufficient leaders and communicates regularly with parents.

Bronze level: Have at least one registered assistant Scoutmaster.
Silver level: Achieve Bronze, plus the troop holds two courts of honor, where troop plans are reviewed with parents.
Gold level: Achieve Bronze, plus the troop holds three courts of honor, where troop plans are reviewed with parents.

Measures

The troop has a Scoutmaster, an assistant, and a committee of at least three members. Ideally, the chartered organization representative should not be dual registered as one of the committee members. Separate troops for males and females under the same chartered organization may have a shared unit committee.

The troop conducts courts of honor where youth are recognized and program plans are shared with parents.

References

“Troop 2020 Scouting’s Journey to Excellence”, scorecard, 513-106, Revised 7/10/19

11 - Trained leadership: Have trained and engaged leaders at all levels. All leaders are required to have youth protection training.

Bronze level: Scoutmaster or an assistant Scoutmaster has completed position-specific training.
Silver level: Achieve Bronze, plus the Scoutmaster and 60% of assistants have completed position-specific training or, if new, will complete within three months of joining.
Gold level: Achieve Silver, plus two-thirds of active committee members have completed position-specific training and at least one person has attended an advanced training course involving a total of at least five days.

Measures

All leaders have completed youth protection training.

Scoutmaster and 60% of the assistants have completed position-specific training or, if new, will complete within three months of joining.

Two-thirds of active committee members (including chartered organization representative) have completed position-specific training.

For Gold, one leader must have attended an advanced training course involving a total of 5 days or more, such as Wood Badge, Summit or Philmont Training Center, at some point in their Scouting tenure.

References

New Unit Organization - Selecting Leaders

Scouting Wire HOME > MARKETING AND MEMBERSHIP HUB > NEW-UNIT DEVELOPMENT > THE NEW-UNIT ORGANIZATION PROCESS (pre-2019):

5.) ORGANIZING COMMITTEE MEETS

Who is responsible?

Chartered organization representative and new-unit organizer

The new-unit organizer plays a key role in the success of the unit organization plan. The new-unit organizer helps to guide the organizing committee throughout the process. If a unit commissioner has been assigned, ask this person to assist with organization efforts.

Explain what is expected of the chartered organization and what is expected of the local council. Distribute copies of “Chartered Organization and Council Responsibilities”. (NOT FOUND, 202003180.) Walk everyone through this agreement.

Preparing for Unit Organization

The most important task of the organizing committee is selecting unit leaders. Before the selection process begins, it is important that the committee learn about Scouting. Committee members should

  • Understand the aims and methods of Scouting.
  • Know the steps to unit organization.
  • Be familiar with program planning.
  • Understand the process for selecting unit leaders.
  • Be aware of training opportunities. Distribute copies of the council or district training schedule.
  • Be familiar with literature and support materials available for leaders.

6.) SELECT AND RECRUIT KEY LEADERS

Who is responsible?

Organizing committee

The first priority of the organizing committee is selecting unit leaders. Give everyone a copy of Cub Scouting’s Selecting Cub Scout Leadership, No. 13-500; Boy Scouting’s Selecting Quality Leaders, No. 18-981; or Venturing Fast Start, No. 25-878.

Choosing Prospective Unit Leaders

Make a list of people who would make good leaders. Choose prospects who exemplify the values of the Boy Scouts of America. Don’t make assumptions about whether a prospect will accept the job; give prospects the opportunity to make their own decisions.

Present the list of candidates to the head of the organization for approval and ask for additional suggestions. Also, have the organization appoint someone—perhaps a member of the organizing committee—to be the chartered organization representative. Explain the basic responsibilities of this person. (See the job descriptions in The Chartered Organization Representative, No. 33118D.) The chartered organization representative represents the organization at the district and council levels as a voting member.

Appointing Other Volunteers

The organizing committee must also recruit and appoint people to serve as the committee chair and committee members. These people may be members of the organizing committee.

With these people in place, and with members of the organizing committee also acting as members of the unit committee, you are ready to complete the process of selecting and recruiting leaders and youth.

100% Trained Leader Goal

GUIDE TO LEADER TRAINING For Council Training Committees, District Training Committees, and Council Staff; 721-920, 2018 Printing, 59 pages.

INTRODUCTION (extracts)

In the early days of the Boy Scouts of America, James E. West, our first Chief Scout Executive, was
asked what the three greatest needs of the new movement were. He replied, “Training, training,
and training.” That is still true today.

Common sense tells us that training is important, and research shows the importance of trained leaders.

A trained leader is knowledgeable and more confident in the role being performed. The knowledge and confidence of a trained leader are quickly sensed by others. Trained leaders impact the quality of programs, leader tenure, youth tenure, and a whole lot more.

A trained leader is better prepared to make the Scouting program all it can be!

It is important to remember that adults must set the example. As we set expectations for Scouts to be trained as part of earning a rank, merit badge, or other recognition, we must expect that all adult leaders will similarly fulfill their training obligation requirements.

Our goal needs to be that we make sure all the leaders in the service area are trained. We are going to have success only when we decide that helping new leaders and untrained tenured leaders get the initial training they need quickly is important and that the training should be worthwhile, fun, and should help them to be effective in the roles they are taking on in Scouting.

The BSA training program is conducted on a “graded” approach that begins with basic skills related to individual roles volunteers take on and progresses over time to increasingly more challenging volunteer role and leadership courses. Early training focuses on basic skills directly related to delivering the Scouting program while supplemental and advanced courses delve into more of the philosophy of Scouting and leadership to support the programs of the Boy Scouts of America.

The training program also incorporates a recognition program at all levels of training to motivate and reward those who participate.

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